The Economic Stimulus Act of 2008

Sample Image The Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 was signed into law on February 13, 2008. The Act is intended to stimulate consumer spending in 2008, and features taxpayer rebate checks for more than 130 million individuals, as well as increased small business expense and depreciation limits, and increased loan limits for Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Housing Administration (FHA).

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Should You Pay Off Your Mortgage or Invest?

Prepared for: Medha Journal Readers

Owning a home outright is a dream that many Americans share. Having a mortgage can be a huge burden, and paying it off may be the first item on your financial to-do list. But competing with the desire to own your home free and clear is your need to invest for retirement, your child's college education, or some other goal. Putting extra cash toward one of these goals may mean sacrificing another. So how do you choose?

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Home Equity Loans and Lines of Credit


 

Introduction
Are you interested in remodeling your outdated kitchen? Perhaps you're drowning in a sea of high-interest credit card debt, or need to find the money to send your child to college. Or maybe you just want the comfort of a cash reserve account, so that you'll be prepared for any unexpected bills. If so, and you're a homeowner, a home equity loan or line of credit may be right for you. Before you sign on the dotted line, however, do some research to make sure you get what's right for your needs.

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Bonds, Interest Rates, and the Impact of Inflation

There are two fundamental ways that you can profit from owning bonds: from the interest that bonds pay, or from any increase in the bond’s price. Many people who invest in bonds because they want a steady stream of income are surprised to learn that bond prices can fluctuate, just as they do with any security traded in the secondary market. If you sell a bond before its maturity date, you may get more than its face value; you could also receive less if you must sell when bond prices are down. The closer the bond is to its maturity date, the closer to its face value the price is likely to be.

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