Nagarjuna and Samkara: Some Comparative Reflections

The main purpose of this brief essay is to show that, contrary to the widespread view of many scholars of Madhyamaka and Advaita-Vedanta, the Sunya-vada…

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Interview: Dr Ramakrishna Puligandla -Part III

Editor’s Note: Following is the third & concluding part of our interview with our new Medha Gold personality, our Resident Philosopher.

The interviewer’s relevant comments, which are a part of the conversational flow, are shown in brackets, in gray font.

Thanks for reading on…

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Interview: Dr Ramakrishna Puligandla -Part I

Editor’s Note: Below is a transcript of the interview with our new Medha Gold personality, our Resident Philosopher. We will also make available the audio of this interview, which has more details on each conversation. Please keep coming back to check.

The interviewer’s relevant comments, which are a part of the conversational flow, are shown in brackets, in gray font.

Thanks for reading on…

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Interview: Dr Ramakrishna Puligandla -Part II

Editor’s Note: Following is the second part of our interview with our new Medha Gold personality, our Resident Philosopher.

The interviewer’s relevant comments, which are a part of the conversational flow, are shown in brackets, in gray font.

Thanks for reading on…

View More Interview: Dr Ramakrishna Puligandla -Part II

The Problem of the Self-Body in the Bhagavadgita: The Problem of Meaning

by Antonio T. de Nicolas, PhD

The completely irreligious mind is, it seems to me, the unreal mind, the tense, void, abstracted mind that does not even see the things that grow out of the earth or feel glad about them: it knows the world only through prices and figures and statistics. For when the world is reduced to number and measure you can indeed be irreligious, unless your numbers turn out to be implicated in music or astronomy, and then the fatal drive to adoration begins again!

The numbers that are germane to music and astronomy are implicated in the magic of seasons and harvests. And there, in spite of yourself, you recapture something of the hidden and forgotten atavistic joy of those Neolithic peoples who, for whole millennia, were quiet and human. – Thomas Merton

 


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